~ Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #100: The Long and Winding Road ~

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Martin Luther King Jr.

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While at the University of Washington in 1970, my husband and I joined the student protest that closed I-5, on May 5. Along with several friends, we were there to object to the illegal and inhumane war our country was waging on Vietnam and Cambodia.

Vietnam War protestPhotographer – Paul Thomas – Seattle Post-Intelligencer

On January 21, 2017, with two girlfriends, I attended the Women’s March in Portland, Oregon. From his first appearance as a candidate to this very moment, Mr. Trump has made it clear he is not qualified to be President of the United States.

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In the ensuing years, often I have said, “things will change in the USA, when young people are angry enough to march in the streets.” Now it is happening, and I salute those who put their feet where their heart and head are.

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We no longer accept going in circles as leadership.

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We’re sick and tired of being tangled by lame old reasons why not justice for all?

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The old is unravelling, and we find ourselves on a path to a changing future.

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Wishing everyone safe harbor, as we navigate uncharted waters.

🐾

 

Thank you Tina for another soul-stretching photography challenge!

https://travelsandtrifles.wordpress.com/2020/06/06/lens-artists-challenge-100-the-long-and-winding-road/

This entry was posted in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge, nature photography, peaceful civil disobedience, photography and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to ~ Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #100: The Long and Winding Road ~

  1. Tina Schell says:

    Yes there are some serious parallels between our war protests and today’s environment Lindy. Thank you for your thoughtful and creative response this week

  2. Millennials and Gen Z-ers will change the world. I am so proud of these young people! (The MLK quote predates the 20th C., in fact it predates the Civil War. In its original form, it’s in the writing of Unitarian abolitionist Theodore Parker.)

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